Sustainable Development Goals: Looking beyond the Millennium Development Goals

At the 2000 United Nation’s Millennium Summit, the Millennium Development Goals (MDG’s) were established. The summit concluded that the following goals were to be achieved by 2015;

  1. Eradicate extreme poverty and hunger
  2. Achieve universal primary education
  3. Promote gender equality and the empowerment of women
  4. Reduce child mortality
  5. Improve maternal health
  6. Combat HIV/AIDS, malaria and other diseases
  7. Ensure environmental sustainability
  8. Develop a global partnership for development.

Governments and leading institutions were tasked to attain these goals by 2015. Barely into the target year, various conferences, publications and policy documents have already been written about the future beyond the MGDs. This so-called ‘Post-2015 Agenda’ will presumably be under the banner of ‘Sustainable Development Goals’ (SDGs). At a special event hosted by the President of the United Nations’ General Assembly on the 25th of September 2013, the UN Secretary-General, Ban Ki-moon presented a report called “A Life of Dignity for All”. In this document, which was adopted by the member states of the UN, the world leaders are reported to have renewed commitments to the vision and targets of the MDG’s. The UN member states will meet this year at a high-level Summit in September 2015 “to adopt a new set of Goals building on the achievements of the MDG’s.”

At the Bokamoso Leadership Forum we would like to invite contributions, articles and creative works related to the MDG’s and the SDGs with a particular focus on Africa (although other contexts with relevance for the African continent are welcome). We especially encourage contributions from young people on ideas on what the ‘post-2015’ development agenda should look like. Possible themes include:

  • How should the MDG’s be reconceptualised post-2015? How should this ‘road to dignity 2030’ look like?
  • What is dignity? How do we secure it for all?
  • What new (and previously excluded) issues should take priority?
  • Which areas need more attention post-2015 in your particular country context?
  • How have you personally benefitted from the MDG’s?
  • What does a post-MDG Africa and world more broadly, look like?
  • How should the MDG’s address issues faced by minorities such as the disabled, LGBTIQ, etc.?

Please contact our editorial team for article submissions or enquiries at: bokamosoafricablog@gmail.com. We look forward to your contributions.

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