Author Archives: Bokamoso

Sustainable Development Goals: Looking beyond the Millennium Development Goals

At the 2000 United Nation’s Millennium Summit, the Millennium Development Goals (MDG’s) were established. The summit concluded that the following goals were to be achieved by 2015;

  1. Eradicate extreme poverty and hunger
  2. Achieve universal primary education
  3. Promote gender equality and the empowerment of women
  4. Reduce child mortality
  5. Improve maternal health
  6. Combat HIV/AIDS, malaria and other diseases
  7. Ensure environmental sustainability
  8. Develop a global partnership for development.

Governments and leading institutions were tasked to attain these goals by 2015. Barely into the target year, various conferences, publications and policy documents have already been written about the future beyond the MGDs. This so-called ‘Post-2015 Agenda’ will presumably be under the banner of ‘Sustainable Development Goals’ (SDGs). At a special event hosted by the President of the United Nations’ General Assembly on the 25th of September 2013, the UN Secretary-General, Ban Ki-moon presented a report called “A Life of Dignity for All”. In this document, which was adopted by the member states of the UN, the world leaders are reported to have renewed commitments to the vision and targets of the MDG’s. The UN member states will meet this year at a high-level Summit in September 2015 “to adopt a new set of Goals building on the achievements of the MDG’s.”

At the Bokamoso Leadership Forum we would like to invite contributions, articles and creative works related to the MDG’s and the SDGs with a particular focus on Africa (although other contexts with relevance for the African continent are welcome). We especially encourage contributions from young people on ideas on what the ‘post-2015’ development agenda should look like. Possible themes include:

  • How should the MDG’s be reconceptualised post-2015? How should this ‘road to dignity 2030’ look like?
  • What is dignity? How do we secure it for all?
  • What new (and previously excluded) issues should take priority?
  • Which areas need more attention post-2015 in your particular country context?
  • How have you personally benefitted from the MDG’s?
  • What does a post-MDG Africa and world more broadly, look like?
  • How should the MDG’s address issues faced by minorities such as the disabled, LGBTIQ, etc.?

Please contact our editorial team for article submissions or enquiries at: bokamosoafricablog@gmail.com. We look forward to your contributions.

On writing and clinging to my big girl panties

On writing and clinging to my big girl panties

Tweet By: Siphokazi Magadla “What was Shakespeare’s state of mind, for instance, when he wrote Lear and Antony and Cleopatra? It was certainly the state of mind most favourable to poetry that there has ever existed. But Shakespeare himself said nothing about it…Nothing indeed was ever said by the artist himself about his state of… Continue Reading

Mid-year reflections on the education theme: Key lessons and future directions

Tweet It feels like just yesterday when we were unveiling the current theme on education and the concurrent theme of the 2014 world cup. The education theme has been particularly well received with many well thought out contributions drawing from both theory and personal experiences of authors as relating to education in Africa. There have… Continue Reading

#BringBackOurGirls

Tweet Our very first question for the current Bokamoso theme is “How ‘universal’ is education? Who is included and who is excluded? Who gets to attend school and who doesn’t?” As we write this article, what we know is that more than 300 girls have been abducted by the extremist Islamic group Boko Haram in Northeast… Continue Reading

The Road to the 2014 Soccer World Cup in Brazil: Critically examining the necessity, meanings and impacts of sporting mega events

The Road to the 2014 Soccer World Cup in Brazil: Critically examining the necessity, meanings and impacts of sporting mega events

Tweet The second theme that the Bokamoso Leadership Forum (Bokamoso) will be looking at for the period of February-July 2014 falls under the title of “The Road to the 2014 Soccer World Cup, Brazil: Critically examining the necessity, meanings and impacts of mega sporting events”. This theme comes nearly four years since South Africa hosted… Continue Reading

Quality Education in Africa: A privilege for the few or a right for all?

Tweet We usher in 2014 with an alarming report from the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), regarding the state of education on the African continent. Under the theme “Teaching and Learning: Achieving quality for all” the report indicates that not a single goal of the Education for All campaign will be achieved… Continue Reading

Change the World Without Taking Power

Change the World Without Taking Power

Tweet The year 2011 saw the collapse of some of Africa’s longest despots: Ben Ali, Mubarak, and Gaddafi in the noted North African awakening. Post conflict reconstruction challenges in these countries since then, especially in Egypt, demonstrate the limitations of centering revolution on changing state power.In “change the world without taking power: the meaning of revolution today” (2002), John Holloway argues… Continue Reading

Arming Youth with Skills and Work: notes from the (Youth version of the) UNESCO Education for All Global Monitoring Report

Arming Youth with Skills and Work: notes from the (Youth version of the) UNESCO Education for All Global Monitoring Report

Tweet By: Gcobani Qambela* I spent much of 2012 researching from home in Lady Frere, rural South Africa. In the course of the year, two young males from our community committed suicide. I could not believe it the first time my mother informed me of the first suicide early in the year. I was taken… Continue Reading

Telling HERstory: Nomzamo Winfreda ‘Winnie’ Madikizela-Mandela and the politics of ‘celebration’

Tweet By: Gcobani Qambela*, Bose Maposa** and Nadia Ahmadou*** Writing on “Birthdays, Legacies, Love, Leadership: Letter to Nelson Mandela” Esther Armah in the Huffington Post takes us to Philadelphia in 1996 where Winnie Madikizela Mandela was the keynote speaker at the Million Woman March. Armah notes that some White American liberal women questioned the legitimacy… Continue Reading

BLF Mid-year review: ‘problems arise when conditions are there for their solutions’

BLF Mid-year review: ‘problems arise when conditions are there for their solutions’

Tweet Walter Sisulu who once said that “It’s a law of life that problems arise when conditions are there for their solutions”. This is often easy to forget in a global and interconnected world with widening gaps in the distribution of wealth, the rising threat of human induced climate change and many unresolved global health… Continue Reading